Links

AIDS Interfaith Network(or AIN)
We have been providing a combination of prevention and care programs for 25 years. Currently we serve 2,000 individual men, women, children and youth who have HIV/AIDS, and make over 20,000 contacts with other at-risk individuals in targeted communities. The Core Values of AIN are Service, Respect, Inclusion, Collaboration, and Compassion. Our Vision is to offer HOPE and ultimately to HELP create a world without HIV/AIDS.
Arts District Chorale
The Arts District Chorale is an organization of excellence recognized for unique, innovative programming of choral masterworks. Through collaboration with the world-class cultural venues of the Dallas Arts District and beyond, the Chorale engages the post-modern observer with a non-static, integrated approach to arts experiences that transform the gathered community, singer and audience member alike. We are a distinguished choral ensemble of gifted amateur and professional collaborators who channel their passion for excellence into the innovative work of the Chorale, creating a community which gives human form to our innate need for hope and meaning through integrated arts experiences. This community is transformed by a shared experience of continuous learning and renewed commitment.
It Gets Better LGBT Natl Project
Founded September 21, 2010 Headquarters Los Angeles, California, United States Area served Worldwide Motto It Gets Better Website http://www.itgetsbetter.org/ It Gets Better is an Internet-based project founded in the United States by Dan Savage and his husband[1] Terry Miller[2] on September 21, 2010, in response to the suicides of teenagers who were bullied because they were gay or because their peers suspected that they were gay. Its goal is to prevent suicide among LGBT youth by having gay adults convey the message that these teens’ lives will improve.[3] The project has grown rapidly: over 200 videos were uploaded in the first week,[4] and the project’s YouTube channel reached the 650 video limit in the next week.[5] The project is now organized on its own website, the It Gets Better Project,[5] and includes more than 50,000 entries from people of all sexual orientations,[6] including many celebrities;[7] the videos have received over 50 million views. A book of essays from the project was released in March 2011.[8] The project was given the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Governor’s Award at the 64th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards for “strategically, creatively and powerfully utilizing the media to educate and inspire,” according to the academy’s chairman and CEO Bruce Rosenblum.
North Texas Food Bank
Welcome to the North Texas Food Bank, where we’re ReThinking Hunger. Since we opened 30 years ago, we have achieved a great deal of success fighting hunger. However, the issue has become much larger and far more complex. The lingering effects of a bad economy continue to bring new faces of hunger to our doors, many for the first time in their lives, and through no fault of their own. To make a meaningful impact today, we cannot simply move more food out the door. We are ReThinking Hunger — providing healthier food, developing new ways to extend our reach, and improving the lives of those we serve.
Partners for Sacred Places
Partners is the only national, non-sectarian, non-profit organization devoted to helping congregations and their communities sustain and actively use older and historic sacred places.
Preservation Dallas
Preservation Dallas is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and revitalization of Dallas’ buildings, neighborhoods and other historical, architectural, and cultural resources. Founded in 1972, Preservation Dallas has a successful history of saving some of our community’s finest landmarks.
Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN)
Mobilizing United Methodists to create full inclusion of all God’s children regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity since 1982 The Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN) is a growing movement of United Methodist individuals, congregations, campus ministries, and other groups working for the full participation of all people in The United Methodist Church. RMN grew out of Affirmation: United Methodists for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns. Until October, 2000 RMN was known as “Reconciling Congregation Program”, but as the movement grew from a “Program” into a movement it was decided that a more fitting name be chosen.
Turtle Creek Chorale
With over 150 singing members, the Chorale presents a full subscription concert series performing annually to live audiences in excess of 50,000. All members of the Chorale are dues paying volunteers who donate over 100,000 hours to rehearsals, service projects and as many as 50 benefit performances annually. The TCC currently has three sub groups: Chamber Chorus, ENCORE! and the Turtle Creek Strangerettes, a precision dance team. The Chorale currently has 38 CDs in addition to a variety of DVDs in its library. Performances by the Chorale have included two state, two regional and three national conventions of the American Choral Directors Association as well as a regional convention of Music Educators National Conference. The Chorale has traveled to Europe, performing sold out concerts in Barcelona, Berlin and Prague; as well as two appearances a Carnegie Hall. The Chorale toured Spain for a week long tour the summer prior to the 2010-2011 31st season. In July of 2012, the Chorale will attend the Gay and Lesbian Association of Choruses (GALA) convention in Denver.
Wilkinson Center
After seeing a child dig in a dumpster for food, The Reverend Clayton Lewis (then pastor of Munger Place United Methodist Church) resolved that should never happen in Dallas. In 1982, he began programs to assist families with food and clothing. Through the shared vision of Reverend Lewis and members from the Highland Park United Methodist Church (Ruth Altshuler, Jim Francis, and Reverend Leighton Farrell); the East Dallas Cooperative Parish was formed to provide the churches with resources to become outposts of service for their neighborhoods in need. From those humble beginnings, the Wilkinson Center (then the Munger Place Emergency Services Center) was formed. In 1985, when volunteer Ruby Wilkinson passed away and her family gave the Center a generous gift, the name was changed to the Wilkinson Center. Today, the Wilkinson Center is a leading poverty rescue and prevention agency for the working poor, serving over 40,000 people annually, mainly in east and southeast Dallas. The Wilkinson Center offers hope, inspiration, and the basic necessities and tools to empower its clients to become self-sufficient and improve their lives.
Zap Malaria
Few civilizations, in all of history, have escaped the disease of malaria. King Tut died from malaria. Alexander the Great likely died of it. Washington and Lincoln suffered from malaria, but by 1950, malaria was wiped out in the United States. In the fall of 2009, the United Nations Foundation made a presentation on the elimination of malaria on the continent of Africa by 2015. Why the urgency? Every thirty (30) seconds, a child in Africa dies from malaria. Only one in five children will live to see their fifth birthday! Malaria is treatable, and like polio in years past, malaria is preventable, if there are enough people in the world who care enough to put our discipleship into action. One of our four focus areas in the United Methodist Church is to help eliminate killer diseases linked to poverty. We care! We are not alone. The Imagine No Malaria campaign links us with some powerful allies – the UN Foundation, the Gates Foundation, Sports Illustrated, the NBA, and others.